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Research ProjectModule HandbookComputingLevel 62Contents PageSection A: Introduction to the Module 3Section B: The Research Proposal 8Section C: The Dissertation Structure 10Section D: Supervision 24Section E: Submission 26Section F: Recommended Reading 283Section A: Introduction to the ModuleOverviewModule Leader for Computing:Stuart Hutchison : 6Credits: 40Learning Hours: 400AimsThe ‘Research Project/Dissertation’ is an essential part of the process of achieving aBachelor’s degree from Arden University. It provides you with the opportunity to workindependently to develop your ability to make critical and evaluative judgements. It isexpected that this will provide an opportunity to integrate the course with practice, developingthe ability to be an effective reflective practitioner. By completing a Research Proposal, youshould demonstrate that you are able to produce work that is relevant in practice and has anacademic standing at a graduate level. This is your opportunity to apply what you have learnedfrom your programme into your area of interest or your workplace, so ensure that it is a pieceof work you invest your time and effort into and you should be proud of the outcome.To achieve the module learning outcomes, you are required to produce: A Research Proposal(marked as either pass or fail)  A Dissertation (10,000 words, worth 100% of the final overall gradeand split into 2 parts: 80% research project and 20% artefact)4Module Learning OutcomesThe module learning outcomes are programme-specific and can be found in the relevant moduledescription form (MDF) from your programme handbook.Module DeliveryThe Research Project Module is divided into 10 separate lessons covering the following topics:Lesson 01: Selecting a Research TopicLesson 02: Supervision and FeedbackLesson 03: Conducting a Literature ReviewLesson 04: Creating an Ethical Research ProposalLesson 05: Additional Research TechniquesLesson 06: Developing Your Research MethodsLesson 07: Planning and Conducting Your ResearchLesson 08: Writing and IntroductionLesson 09: Interpreting and Critically Evaluating Your ResultsLesson 10: Writing the ReportThe module lessons combine academic research and practical advice and will be a valuableresource for you as you make progress towards developing your Proposal and completing yourDissertation.5Please note the following steps carefully:You will spend the first few weeks on the module working your way through the various lessonsand completing the range of activities that are included within the materials. These activities arenot part of the assessment process for the module, but they will help you develop yourunderstanding of the research process and assist you developing your ideas.The module lesson materials will therefore be available to you throughout your experience on themodule. In addition, a wide range of texts and articles are available to you on the EBSCO andEBook Central databases that you can access via iLearn.Once you have worked your way through the lessons you now need to consider your ideas/areaof interest for your research project/Dissertation title and submit this on the Dissertation WorkingTitle Form to the relevant Module Leader listed on page 3. From the information on this form theModule Leader will allocate a dedicated Supervisor, with expertise in your area of interest, towork with you towards completion of the research project/Dissertation. You should include asmuch detail as possible about your proposed research project. This is so that e can allocate asupervisor with the appropriate experience to support you. Please ensure that you complete ALLfields on the form otherwise we may have to return the form to you and this will cause delays inprocessing your form.The Module Leader will contact you by e-mail when the Supervisor has been appointed. Pleasesee Section E for more information on working with your Supervisor.Step One: Complete Lesson MaterialsStep Two:Prepare a Research Working TitleStep Three:Prepare a Research Proposal6The Proposal should be submitted to your Supervisor. Section B of this document providesdetailed information on the Proposal stage.Ethical approval is also needed from your Supervisor prior to the recruitment of participants.No recruitment or data collection must be carried out until you receive formal notificationthat your study has been approved by the ethics panel.An ethics approval form needs to be submitted by you and is assessed on a pass/fail basis. Inthe event of the Proposal not being approved, you are required to re-design and resubmit basedon your Supervisor’s recommendations. Recruitment and data collection can then start as soonas the approval is granted. You should send your completed Arden University Ethics Form toyour Supervisor (for first sign-off), provided that your Supervisor is satisfied that your proposedproject is viable and the form is completed to the required standard, and they will send on to theModule Leader (for second sign-off) and, if necessary, to the ethics panel for ethical approval.When your ethics form has been approved you can start your data collection for yourproject, your student record will be updated and from that point you will have access toyour submission portal.Whilst collecting data your Dissertation will be taking shape and you will also be developingyour artefact. To make sure you are on the right track throughout the writing process you willshare chapters with your Supervisor allowing for a formative feedback opportunity which willhelp the final submission to take shape. You will also have opportunities to discuss yourprogress in developing the artefact. You should ensure that you full engage with theopportunities provided for formative feedback, communicate regularly with your supervisorand provide work for review on a regular basis.Step Five:Formative Feedback of Dissertation Chapters and ArtefactStep Four:Complete Ethics Form7The deadline for submission of the final Dissertation should be agreed with your Supervisor,being mindful of the timing of your registration on the programmeStep Six:Dissertation Submission8Section B: The Research ProposalResearch Proposal ContentsResearch Proposal:The second key output for this module, after the Research Project Working Title form, is theResearch Proposal which you are required to produce for your research project, in a fieldrelating to the subject of your qualification. This is a gatekeeping stage for your finalDissertation. You will work with your appointed Supervisor to complete your Proposal by theagreed deadline. Your Proposal should cover all of the following areas.RationaleThis should contain an explanation of the problem/issue and justification as to why it isimportant. There should also be a series of precisely written objectives, to include observableoutcomes, that flow from this section.You should also demonstrate your knowledge of relevant literature by identifying key debatesto clearly show how this will inform your research.Method, Data & EthicsThis section must include an explanation of fundamental issues in methodology followed bya full description of the methodological approach to be adopted in the proposed research.Your data collection method should be justified. You should explore issues of validity,reliability and generalisability of the research Proposal and make reference to ethical issues.In addition, you should also discuss relevant practical issues relating to the research to beundertaken. For example, the possible need to obtain organisational consent as well as thetimescales involved in completing your project. A more detailed project plan should beappended.ReferencesYou must include references in support of your Proposal, which should be used in accordancewith the appropriate convention for your programme:– APA standards for Psychology.– OSCOLA for Law– Arden University Harvard for all other programmes.A Project PlanA project plan, which outlines the proposed timescale for completion of your Dissertationincluding significant activities, should also be attached to the Proposal. We understand thatthe timescales shown in the plan may change but it is important to give consideration and toset out your proposed timescales at this early stage of the process.Submission of your Proposal for MarkingYour Proposal must be emailed to your Supervisor. The Supervisor will review the Proposaland grade it as a pass or fail, they will notify you of the pass/fail mark via e-mail. When youhave achieved the pass grade for the Proposal, you will then move on to the Dissertation stage9of the module. You cannot submit your Dissertation without your Proposal beingapproved.Ethical ApprovalIf you identify that you will be undertaking research that requires ethical approval you shouldsubmit a Dissertation Ethical Approval Form at the same time that you submit yourproposal.Under no circumstances should the recruitment of participants begin until writtenapproval (usually by email) is received from the Arden Ethics Panel. Failure to obtainethical approval will result in you being unable to submit your work.Make sure to include any required documents outlined in the form such as the ParticipantInformation Sheet and the Consent Form.10Section C: The Dissertation StructureHelpful guidelines on developing your Dissertation are contained within the lesson materialsand a summary is provided here:Structure and contentThe Dissertation itself is made up of a number of chapters each of which serves a specificpurpose. All of the chapters are tied together by the threads of the research question andshould represent a coherent and complete picture of the work undertaken. The Overall lengthof the Dissertation (excluding formatting pages and appendices) must not exceed 11,000words (10,000 word count plus 10% allowance). For computing programmes, a notional 2,000words is allocated to an artefact and the report is 8,000 words. Let’s consider the key chaptersin the following sub-sections.FormattingThe Dissertation takes the form of a formal academic report including a title page (stating thestudent name and ID number, course title, Dissertation title and word count), declaration,acknowledgements, 300-word abstract with 5 key words listed, a contents page and a listof tables and figures. These set the shape for the rest of the report and do not form part of theword count. The declaration should include three signatures, where appropriate, from thestudent showing that it is i) their own work, ii) that the work is not confidential, iii) agreeing forArden to store and use the work as a reference.IntroductionAs the first chapter of the Dissertation this is probably the one that you will revisit last beforesubmitting. The purpose of the chapter is to set out and justify the study that you haveundertaken in the wider social context. Crucially, the whole Dissertation document should bewritten in the past tense, the idea being that the write up has been undertaken after theresearch has been completed. The introduction chapter should lead the author from anintroduction to the topic through to presentation of the objectives and structure of theDissertation. Key terms should be introduced and defined, and justification provided fromdifferent perspectives. If the study is based upon a specific organisation or context then it willrequire introducing and justification will need to be provided for conducting the study. Thevalue of the study will also need to be considered. A typical structure for this chapter wouldbe as follows: Background – an overview of the topic and its merit as a research topic Rationale – justification for the study Case study – if relevant, an overview of the organisation or study context Objectives and research questions Dissertation structureExpected word count: 1,000 words11The Introduction section should include the research question(s) that was/were asked inorder to address the objectives. A common error is not giving the Introduction section thetime required to ensure that it is well referenced and clearly justifies the study.Literature ReviewThe literature review chapter is where you will consider the work that has been undertakenpreviously, in areas that are relevant to the topic you are studying. You will discuss with yourSupervisor to identify the range of topics that you should cover.There is a range of material that can be used in the literature review. For example, books andacademic journal articles are the most commonly used. When selecting information sources,it is important to consider the relative value of the source. Peer reviewed sources such asbooks and journals are much more valuable than organisational websites, for example. Insome cases, news articles may be an important source of information. The most valuablesources of information are journal articles and wherever possible should constitute the bulk ofthe research sources you use. Once sufficient sources have been gathered there areconsiderations to be made. The relevance of the source should be considered. If it is notrelevant, abandon it. If there are two sources, one of which is better, then use the bettersource. Once you have gathered sufficient information for a well referenced, balancedapproach, you should conclude your argument. It is easy to become bogged down working onthe literature review so take a tactical approach and know when to say enough is enough. Atypical structure for this chapter would be as follows:If the chapter is overly descriptive then you cannot expect to achieve more than a pass. Awidely referenced literature review that critically evaluates the literature will score bettermarks. The literature review must be critical, identifying the relevant theoretical ideas,concepts, debates and issues in the relevant field.MethodologyA methodology is defined as ‘a system of methods used in a particular area of study or activity’.As Computing students you will be engaged in study i.e. the research project, as well as anactivity i.e. the development of an artefact. As such, you will be writing about two types ofmethodology: Research methodology: how you intend to undertake research and gather data. Development methodology: how you intend to undertake the development of the Introduction – a brief introduction to state what is contained within thechapter Topics – the number of titles of these will vary depending on your area ofstudy Summary – the chapter needs summarising to conclude where yourresearch fits within the existing literature Questions – what question(s) you aim to answer or explore in yourDissertationExpected word count: 2,000 words12artefact, this relates to aspects of the Software Development Life Cycle (SDLC)You write about the research methodology in the methodology chapter, the developmentmethodology will be discussed in a separate section titled Artefact. The methodology chapterserves two purposes and it is important to include both in order to achieve a good mark.Methodology is the study of undertaking research. An engagement with the philosophy ofresearch and the associated approaches is important to demonstrate your understanding ofresearch at a fundamental level. Crucially, this is not just a review of different methods, it iswhere the selected philosophies, ontology and approaches are identified and justified. Onceagain, a balance between reviewing approaches and justifying those used must be struck.The second purpose is to demonstrate, critique and justify the actual methods used. In thissection, the research questions can be used to structure the critique of research methods. Themethods used to answer each question should be presented, critiqued, justified and theapproach to employing them, analysed. This activity is termed the operationalisation ofmethodology, the aim being to show the reader how to replicate the study, the issues thatwere encountered and why certain methods were used. A typical structure for this chapterwould be as follows:The chapter must be well referenced containing sources that go beyond the use of books.Excellent analysis and justification of the actual approaches used is crucial in achieving goodmarks.Results and Discussion Introduction – a brief introduction to state what is contained within thechapter Philosophical assumptions – an appreciation of research philosophy.Crucially, the selected approach should be identified and justified. Research questions – each question should be used as a subheading. Ineach case the methods selected should be critiqued and justified. Theinformation relevant to populations, sampling methods, deployment plans,the design of instruments and limitations can be included on a question byquestion basis. Validity and Reliability – this can be considered on a question by questionbasis or in a section on its own. A consideration is made of how the methodaddresses the needs of the question and how replicable they are. Data Selection and Collection – a detailed breakdown of how and why datawas collected and the associated practical challenges. Ethics and Bias – a consideration of the relevant ethical issues and any biasthat may be inherent within the study or the subsequent analysis withthought given to validity, reliability and generalisability. Again, this can beconsidered on a question by question basis or in a section on its own. Limitations – discuss any relevant limitations to the methods selected.Expected Word Count: 2,500 words13This chapter is where the results of the primary investigation are presented, analysed anddiscussed. The chapter must go beyond simply presenting the results. The analysis of thedata and research is essential. If a quantitative approach has been taken, then variables canbe tested against one another to show relationships within the data set. Qualitative data canbe coded and discussed by themes to characterise the trends which underpin the observeddata. Essentially, the gathered results need to be compared to the findings of establishedliterature to demonstrate either similarities or differences. Tight links to the literature isimportant in discussing the meaning of the results.Presenting the findings needs to be a priority in this chapter. Selecting appropriate methodsneeds to be considered carefully. Graphs should only be used where they add value to thework and make a visual impact. Where graphs are included, different graph types must beused correctly for the data being presented and the information presented must be clear. Atypical structure for this chapter would be as follows:A descriptive presentation of the results will not achieve any more than a pass. Where links toliterature are made and variables are tested against one another, higher marks will beachieved. Appropriate statistical testing, where valid, will improve the marks achieved. Thehighest marks will be attributed to Dissertations pushing the boundaries of what is publishedin the literature.ArtefactFor Computing programmes an additional equivalent 2,000 words are allocated for theartefact. This artefact should be a demonstration of your ability to produce a product thatdemonstrates your skills and expertise and reflects the research undertaken as part of theresearch project. It is in this section that you discuss your development methodology.In this section you should present screenshots of your artefact (include screenshots of yourcode in the appendix where relevant and appropriate), discuss how the artefact has beeninformed by the research that you have undertaken as part of the project, discuss the method Introduction – a brief introduction to state what is contained within thechapter. Signposts to where the research questions are addressed by theprimary research should be included. Response rates – overview the rate of response from primary researchmethods. Demographic information can be included here. Importantly, theresults must be linked to information about the population under study toshow that the results are representative. Results – the findings are presented with suitable discussion and analysiswith links to established literature. Ensure you clarify why statisticalanalysis is inferential or descriptive in this context characterising trendswhich have arisen. When using qualitative data ensure that quotes arepresented with appropriate contextual analysis. Summary – summarise the chapter with key findings and link to theresearch question.Expected Word Count: 2,500 words14undertaken to develop and deliver the artefact and discuss any testing and modificationsundertaken as part of the development. Make sure to annotate the screenshots and codelistings to explain what is going on rather than leaving it to the marker to infer this. Whenmarking this section the marker will rely solely on the evidence provided in this section so youshould provide as much detail as possible so that the marker can make an informed judgementas to the technical skills and competencies being demonstrated.A descriptive approach will not achieve any more than a pass. Instead, you should aim toprovide a reflective account that considers how your chosen development methodology hasimpacted on the artefact and how the design and development has been influenced by theliterature, your research and subsequent testing where appropriate.ConclusionsLike the introduction, this chapter is often overlooked and not given enough care. Theconclusion chapter is essential in tying together the threads that have been woven throughoutthe work bridging the literature review with the results and discussions section. It relatesdirectly to the beginning of the Dissertation and shows what was found in the process ofaddressing the objectives and answering the questions that were initially set. This chapter alsoprovides the opportunity to reflect on process as well as look forward to where the work couldbe taken next with appropriate insight (e.g. costings for implementation of recommendedactions).Crucially, the research questions that were set in the introduction and discussed again in themethodology chapter must be addressed directly here to demonstrate how they wereanswered and what was found. This chapter also allows the opportunity to evaluate where theDissertation fits within the literature. The conclusions chapter is not the opportunity tointroduce new things. A typical structure for this chapter would be as below.A strong set of conclusions that contain all of the listed elements are needed in order toachieve a good mark. Justification as to how this work is independent and developmental,rather than just a patchwork of the work, thoughts and interpretations of others’ which isstitched together by a few threads of the your own making. Many, otherwise strongDissertations, have fallen apart in this chapter, leading to a lower mark. Introduction – a brief introduction to state what is contained within thechapter. Screenshots of the artefact and code listings, explaining implementedfeatures. Explanation of how development of the artefact has been informed by yourresearch and where appropriate testing. Critically discuss the development methodology chosen to develop theartefact.Expected Word Count: 2,000 words15References and AppendicesA good reference list is essential in achieving a good mark. The list should only containreferences that are directly cited within the text. The required approach must be taken asspecified in the study skills area. As with all other assessments, a bibliography is not required.Ensure your referencing conforms to the relevant framework listed in section B.Appendices are opportunities to include supporting documentation such as a copy of a surveyor interview schedule that the reader can be directed to. If appendices are used, they must bereferred to in the main body of the work. Marks cannot be awarded for work contained inappendices, but these can assist in the understanding for arguments and discussions madewithin the Dissertation.PresentationThere are marks available for presentation. When considering this the marker will look at theuse of language, the overall structure and coherence of the document and the referencing. Aconsistent use of font size and spacing is essential.References must be used as required by the appropriate referencing convention and spellingand grammatical errors should not be present in the final document. With some care theseare easy marks to add to your overall score.DISSERTATION ASSESSMENT CRITERIAPresentation: structure, language, grammar, visuals, logic and coherence and appropriate andsystematic use of the appropriate referencing system will be form part of each sectionsassessment. Introduction – a brief introduction to state what is contained within the chapter General conclusions – overview the key findings and their implications Research question conclusions – taking each research question separately clearlydemonstrate what has been found in answering them. It is also important to point outwhat was not found. Recommendations – based upon the findings, recommend courses of action toprovide direct benefit. If linked to a specific case study these could be organisationalrecommendations. If considering a topic in a more abstract way these could begeneralised recommendations that have a wider scope. Wider application beyondthe confines of the original research focus could also be made here. Errors and limitations – a final opportunity to recognise the things that may havelimited the work undertaken. These build upon those discussed in the methodologyas they may include practical limitations encountered along the way or flaws inapproaches that only became apparent later on. Recommendations for further study – themes may emerge from the study thatwarrant further investigation. Outline what these are and how they may beaddressed in the future.Expected Word Count: 2,000 words16The project is a final deliverable due at the end of the module. This accounts for 100% of thetotal mark and is split into two parts: (a) a report (80% of the total) and (b) an artefact (20% ofthe total).Report (weighted at 80% of the module mark) Item weighting0-3940-4950-5960-6970 +Introduction(10%)• Background – an overview of the topicand its merit as a research topic• Rationale – justification for the study• Case study – if relevant, an overview ofthe organisation or study context• Objectives and research questions• Dissertation structureExpected word count 800 wordsAims and objectives notarticulated or absent. Thepurpose of the project isunclear with poor justificationof chosen topic.Where included the casesstudy is not adequate. Theoutline of the dissertationstructure is missing or notadequate..Confused or vague researchaims and objectives. Thebackground of the project isacceptable but aspects arenot clear. Where includedthe case study is adequatebut lacking in depth orsignificant issues withrelevance, The outline ofthe structure of thedissertation is basic.The background of theproject is good thoughthere may be aspects thatlack depth or issues withclarity in some cases.The research aims andobjectives arereasonable. The casestudy is acceptablethough may be lacking indepth or clarity in places.A fair outline of thestructure of thedissertation.A very goodarticulation of projectbackground andfocused, relevantresearch aims andobjectives. The purposeof the project is veryclear. A very cleararticulation of the casestudy where it is used.A very good outline ofthe structure of thedissertation.Exceptional articulationof project background;the articulation of aimsand objectives is at apublishable level.Excellent articulation ofthe case study where it ispresent. An excellentoutline of the dissertationstructure.Review of Literature(20%)•Introduction – a brief introduction tostate what is contained within the chapter• Topics – the number of titles of thesewill vary depending on your area of study• Summary – the chapter needssummarising to conclude where yourresearch fits within the existing literature• Questions – what question(s) you aim toanswer or explore in your DissertationExpected word count: 1600 wordsThere is little evidence ofrelevant and current literature.The review of the literature isfragmented and incoherent.There is little or no criticalappraisal of the literature.There is evidence ofliterature having beenreviewed, but it is limitedor there are issues withcurrency and validity.Critique of existingliterature is superficialand/or not sufficientlyrelated to the chosen topic.There is good evidenceof literature having beenreviewed.There is a good attemptto critique existingliterature, but the link tothe project could bestronger.The review of theliterature is very goodand is from a range ofsources and journals.There is a developedcritique of existingliterature and it isclearly linked back tothe chosen topic.There is an excellentcoverage of relevantliterature from a range ofsources and journals.There is a highlydeveloped critique ofexisting literature and itis clearly linked back tothe chosen topic. 18 Methodology(25%)• Introduction – a brief introduction tostate what is contained within thechapter• Philosophical assumptions – anappreciation of research philosophy.Crucially, the selected approach shouldbe identified and justified.• Research questions – each questionshould be used as a subheading. In eachcase the methods selected should becritiqued and justified. The informationrelevant to populations, samplingmethods, deployment plans, the designof instruments and limitations can beincluded on a question by questionbasis.• Validity and Reliability – this can beconsidered on a question by questionbasis or in a section on its own. Aconsideration is made of how themethod addresses the needs of thequestion and how replicable they are.• Data Selection and Collection – adetailed breakdown of how and whydata was collected and the associatedpractical challenges.• Ethics and Bias – a consideration ofthe relevant ethical issues and any biasthat may be inherent within the study orthe subsequent analysis with thoughtgiven to validity, reliability andgeneralisability. Again, this can beconsidered on a question by questionbasis or in a section on its own.• Limitations – discuss any relevantlimitations to the methods selected.Expected Word Count: 2000 wordsPhilosophical assumptionsand choice of method areunclear or not justified.Description of method, interms of population, samplingmethods, deployment,instruments, validity andreliability, ethics, limitationsetc is unclear and inadequate.The breakdown of dataselection and collection isinappropriate for the study.Some philosophicalassumptions andjustification for choice ofmethod exists but aspects ofthis may be questioned.Key aspects of method aredescribed, in terms ofpopulation, samplingmethods, deployment,instruments, validity andreliability, ethics,limitations etc, butdescription may besuperficial and/or unclear,or have omissions.The method isappropriate, with goodjustification andphilosophicalassumptions provided forit.Key aspects of the methodare described, in terms ofpopulation, samplingmethods, deployment,instruments, validity andreliability, ethics,limitations etc but withsome minor omissions orlack of detail.Method is appropriate,with very clearphilosophicalassumptions andjustification provided.All aspects of method, interms of population,sampling methods,deployment, instruments,validity and reliability,ethics, limitations etc aredescribed well with noobvious omissions.Method is appropriate,with excellentphilosophicalassumptions andjustification provided.All aspects of themethod, in terms ofpopulation, samplingmethods, deployment,instruments, validityand reliability, ethics,limitations etc aredescribed in excellentdetail. 19 Results and Discussion (25%)• Introduction – a brief introduction tostate what is contained within thechapter. Signposts to where the researchquestions are addressed by the primaryresearch should be included.• Response rates – overview the rate ofresponse from primary researchmethods. Demographic information canbe included here. Importantly, theresults must be linked to informationabout the population under study toshow that the results are representative.• Results – the findings are presentedwith suitable discussion and analysiswith links to established literature.Ensure you clarify why statisticalanalysis is inferential or descriptive inthis context characterising trends whichhave arisen. When using qualitative dataensure that quotes are presented withappropriate contextual analysis.• Summary – summarise the chapterwith key findings and link to theresearch question.Expected Word Count: 2000 wordsPresentation of data /results is unclear andinappropriate. Analysis ofdata is inappropriate orsuperficial. Analysiscontains significantinconsistencies There isunsubstantiated or invalidinterpretation of results.There is little or no linkingto theory or literature..Some elements of the data/ results are unclear orinappropriate. Analysis ofthe data is superficial butacceptable. Some of theanalysis is inconsistent orinappropriateInterpretation of results isvalid but superficial ornot linked well to thestudy’s aims..Presentation of the data/ results is generallyclear. Analysis of thedata is appropriate butlimited. Analysiscontains some minorinconsistencies orinaccuracies. Thereis good interpretation ofresults in relation to thestudy’s aims.Presentation of thedata / results is veryclear. Analysis isappropriate andthorough. Analysiscontains noinaccuracies orinconsistencies Thereis very goodinterpretation ofresults in relation tothe study’s aims..Presentation of the data/ results is exceptionallyclear. Analysis isappropriate, thorough,and possibly innovative.Analysis contains noinaccuracies orinconsistencies. There isexcellent interpretationof results in relation tothe study’s aims. 20 Conclusions and recommendations(20%)• Introduction – a brief introduction tostate what is contained within thechapter• General conclusions – overview thekey findings and their implications• Research question conclusions –taking each research questionseparately clearly demonstrate whathas been found in answering them. Itis also important to point out whatwas not found.• Recommendations – based upon thefindings, recommend courses ofaction to provide direct benefit. Iflinked to a specific case study thesecould be organisationalrecommendations. If considering atopic in a more abstract way thesecould be generalisedrecommendations that have a widerscope. Wider application beyond theconfines of the original research focuscould also be made here.• Errors and limitations – a finalopportunity to recognise the thingsthat may have limited the workundertaken. These build upon thosediscussed in the methodology as theymay include practical limitationsencountered along the way or flaws inapproaches that only became apparentlater on.• Recommendations for further study– themes may emerge from the studythat warrant further investigation.Outline what these are and how theymay be addressed in the future.Expected Word Count: 1600 words.Limited or absent generalconclusions and limited orno discussion of researchquestion conclusions. Thereare no recommendations interms of courses of action,or these are very superficial.No discussion of errors orlimitations, or these are verylimited and add no value.No recommendations forfurther study, or these arevery limited.There is a superficialpresentation of generalconclusions and researchquestion conclusions.Some recommendations forcourses of action at a basiclevel. Some discussions oferrors or limitations but at abasic level.There is appropriate, butlimited, discussion ofpossibilities for futureresearch.There is an appropriate setof general conclusions andresearch questionconclusions though theseare lacking in depth.Good recommendations forcourses of action thoughthere may be some errors oromissions. Good discussionsof errors or limitations butwith scope for further depth.There is a gooddiscussion of possibilitiesregarding future research.There is a very good set ofgeneral conclusions andresearch questionconclusions and a very gooddiscussion of the issuesraised.Some very goodrecommendations forcourses of action thoughthere may be some minorerrors or omissions. Verygood discussions of errors orlimitations but with somescope for further depth.There is a very gooddiscussion of possibilitiesregarding future research.There is an excellentreflection about the studyin terms of general andresearch questionconclusions and anexcellent discussion of theissues raised.An excellent set ofrecommendations forcourses of action.Errors and limitations ofthe study are addressed ata very high level.There is excellentdiscussion of possibilitiesregarding future research. 21Artefact (weighted at 20% of the module mark) Item weighting0-3940-4950-5960-6970 +Artefact(100%)An artefact that demonstrates proficiencyin terms of developing a product thatrelates to the research project. Includethis section after the results section ofyour project.• Introduction – a brief introduction tostate what is contained within the chapter.• Screenshots of the artefact and codelistings, explaining implemented features.• Explanation of how development of theartefact has been informed by yourresearch and where appropriate testing.• Critically discuss the developmentmethodology chosen to develop theartefact.Expected word count 2000 words.The artefact is either absent,or very limited in terms ofimplementation, with littleevidence of technicalproficiency or expertise.There is little to no discussionof how the artefact has beendeveloped in light of theresearch undertaken duringthe project and littleconsideration of thedevelopment process or anytesting and modifications.An artefact is presented butimplemented to a limitedextent and with limitedfunctionality,demonstrating limitedtechnical proficiency andexpertise. There is scopefor much more depth ofimplementation. There issome discussion of how theartefact has been developedin light of the researchundertaken during theproject and someconsideration of thedevelopment process or anytesting and modificationsbut there is scope furtherwork.An artefact is presented,with good evidence ofimplementation of anumber offunctionalities. Theartefact demonstrates agood level of technicalproficiency andexpertise. Aspects ofimplementation could befurther developed.A good discussion ofhow the artefact has beendeveloped in light of theresearch undertakenduring the project and agood consideration of thedevelopment processincluding any testing andmodifications.A very good artefact ispresented, withevidence of a high levelof expertise andtechnical proficiency.Some minor issues interms ofimplementation.There is a very gooddiscussion of how theartefact has beendeveloped in light ofthe research undertakenduring the project and avery good considerationof the developmentprocess including anytesting andmodifications.An excellent artefact ispresented demonstratingan exceptional level oftechnical proficiency andexpertise.An excellent discussionof how the artefact hasbeen developed in lightof the researchundertaken during theproject. An excellentconsideration of thedevelopment processincluding any testing andmodifications. 22ARDEN UNIVERSITY GENERIC LEVEL 6 ASSESSMENT CRITERIA Level 6 study represents the student’s increasing autonomy and independence in relation to their knowledge, understanding and skills. At Level 6,students are expected to demonstrate problem solving skills in both practical and theoretical contexts. This should be supported by an understandingof appropriate theory, creativity in expression and thought based on independent but informed judgments. Students should demonstrate the abilityto seek out, invoke, analyse and evaluate competing theories and claims to knowledge and work in a critically constructive manner. Work at this levelis articulate, coherent and skilled.GradeMark BandsGeneric Assessment CriteriaFirst(1)80%+An exceptional knowledge base exploring and analysing the discipline, its theory and any associated ethical considerations.The work demonstrates extraordinary independence of thought and originality. There is exceptional management oflearning resources and a high degree of autonomy is demonstrated which goes above and beyond the brief. The workdemonstrates intellectual originality and creativity. Writing is exceptionally well structured and accurately referencedthroughout. Where appropriate, outstanding professional skills are demonstrated. The work is original and with someadditional effort could be considered for internal publication.70-79%An excellent information base within which the discipline is explored and analysed. There is considerable originality in theapproach and the work demonstrates confidence and autonomy and extends to consider ethical issues. Learning resourceshave been managed with exceptional confidence and the work exceeds the assessment brief. Writing is exceptionally wellstructured and accurately referenced throughout. Where appropriate, an excellent level of professional skills aredemonstrated and the work demonstrates a high level of intellectual and academic skills.Uppersecond(2:1)60-69%A very good knowledge base which explores and analyses the discipline, its theory and any associated ethical issues. There isevidence of some originality and independence of thought. A very good range of learning resources underpin the work andthere is clear evidence of self-directed research. The work demonstrates the ability to analyse the subject and apply theorywith good academic and intellectual skills. Academic writing skills are good, expression is accurate overall and the work isconsistently referenced throughout. 23 Lowersecond(2:2)50-59%A satisfactory understanding of the discipline which supports some analysis, evaluation and problem-solving within thediscipline. There may be reference to some of the ethical considerations. The work shows a sound level of competence inmanaging basic sources and materials. Academic writing skills are good and accurate overall and the work is planned andstructured with some thought. Professional skills are satisfactory (where appropriate). The work may lack originality butacademic and intellectual skills are moving into the critical domain. The work is referenced throughout.Third(3)40-49%Basic level of performance in which there are some omissions in the understanding of the subject, its underpinning theoryand ethical considerations. There is little evidence of independent thought and the work shows a basic use of sources andmaterials. Academic and intellectual skills are limited. The work may lack structure overall. There are some difficulties indeveloping professional skills (where appropriate). There is an attempt to reference the work.MarginalFail30-39%A limited piece of work in which there are clear gaps in understanding the subject, its underpinning theory and ethicalconsiderations. The work shows a limited use of sources and materials. Academic and intellectual skills are weak and thereare errors in expression and the work may lack structure overall. There are difficulties in developing professional skills(where appropriate). The work lacks original thought and is largely imitative.29% andbelowA poor performance in which there are substantial gaps in knowledge and understanding, underpinning theory and ethicalconsiderations. The work shows little evidence in the use of appropriate sources and materials. Academic writing skills arevery weak and there are numerous errors in expression. The work lacks structure overall. Professional skills (whereappropriate) are not developed. The work is imitative. 24Section D: SupervisionEach student should know that the Dissertation part of their degree requires significant thought and preparation. This is not a ‘taught’ modulewhere we are delivering and assessing a fixed body of knowledge. Instead, the student should is the driver here, initiating activity around theDissertation and reading and investigating their topic. Students should be able to work unaided in the main. This is an activity that is yours andfor you alone to progress and be responsible for, with some advice from a Supervisor acting as a guide and facilitator.A Supervisor will be assigned to you based on the proposed area of investigation, once you have submitted the Working Title form. YourSupervisor will then work with you towards completion of the Proposal stage, Ethics Form and then for the Dissertation. Your Supervisor willprovide you with feedback as to the project’s viability and discuss with you any amendments that need to be made before you can proceed. Inorder for this to happen you should ensure that your Supervisor has made contact with you within the FIRST week of being appointed to aSupervisor (your Module Leader will have emailed you both when you were assigned to your Supervisor).Your Supervisor will discuss specific details of how the ‘working relationship’ will be implemented in practice. This is an ideal time to raise anyconcerns about the development of the initial Proposal and how the Dissertation or journal article process will work in practice. Further generalguidance on the supervision process is detailed below.The emphasis of the supervision will be upon: Encouraging you to carry out a comprehensive review of relevant literature in support of your research and to formulate a Proposal andDissertation based project commensurate with study at level 6. Planning appropriate methodologies to underpin your research and to articulate your rationale for the methodology used. Encouraging you to keep appropriate records of action/progress, such as reference sources, interview and contact logs. Providing general support, direction and guidance as required throughout the research project process.You will be required to conduct all stages of the project independently but with advice and guidance given by your academic Supervisor. YourSupervisor is an invaluable resource to you and every effort should be made to liaise with your Supervisor throughout the entire research process.2526Section E: SubmissionIt is very important that your Supervisor is allowed sufficient time for the reading of drafts. You MUST NOT EXPECT your Supervisor to read workinstantly when a deadline is near. Ideally, a full draft should be sent between two weeks and a month before the relevant deadline to allow timefor changes and amendments – subject of course, to the Supervisor’s schedule.Submission Arrangements:Hand-In DateThe date for final submission of your Dissertation should be agreed with your Supervisor, there is the opportunity to submit approximately on the15th of every quarter from January. When you are ready to submit your Dissertation work for marking, you are required to upload an electroniccopy of your Dissertation to iLearn. There is no need to submit a hard copy to Arden University.Dissertation Submission FormatThe Dissertation will be required to be presented in the following format following the structure outlined in section C:The conditions of an Arden Bachelor’s degree require that you complete asubstantial piece of independent research. Therefore, the responsibility for thefinal submission of the Proposal and thereafter, the Dissertation, is yours and notyour Supervisor’s. Ultimately, you must be the judge of what the Proposal and thefinal Dissertation will contain. It is not the role of the Supervisor to providedetailed comments on drafts. While you can expect some feedback on drafts thiswill be of a general nature and will not be a detailed analysis of your submission.The Supervisor will not comment on amendments made in the light of thisfeedback.The work is yours and not the Supervisors.27– Typed (word-processed) on 1 page of A4 using double spacing. The recommended font is Arial, size 12 for the main content andappreciating font sizes for sub-headers and headers etc.– All text should be justified, so that it is straight edged (like a book).– Any pages preceding those of the main text should be numbered at the centre of the foot of each page.– Make sure that your Dissertation reads well. Keep paragraphs short and use appropriate headings. Pay particular attention to grammarand sentence construction. Keep content clear, to the point and jargon free. Figures and Tables should be clearly labelled, referenced sequentially as they appear in the text and produced via software packages.These should be ideally placed on a separate page or within the text but as close to the text at which it is referred to. Where appropriate,acknowledgement of the source should be presented on the page beneath the Figure/Table. Make sure that you include a Contents Page using appropriate and correct numbering.Re-submissions The Dissertation may only be resubmitted once the grade has been confirmed by the External Examiner. Dissertation resubmissions must be received no more than twelve months after the date of communication of the original result.28Section F: Recommended ReadingThere is a range of texts on Research Methods available on the EBSCO and EBook Central online libraries. References are formattedaccording to the convention of the relevant programme. A selection with suggested programme areas is as follows:Key TextsEBSCOBell, J and Waters, S. (2014). Doing your research project: A guide for first time researchers. (5th ed). (Open up Study Skills). Open UniversityPress, McGraw Hill Education.Ebook CentralMcMillan, K. (2011). How to Write Dissertations & Project Reports. Prentice Hall.Fink, A., 2013. Conducting research literature reviews: from the internet to paper (4th edition). London: Sage.Jesson, J., Matheson, L. and Lacey, F., 2011. Doing your literature review: traditional and systematic techniques, London: Sage.Press Matthew, B., and Ross, L., 2010. Research methods: a practical guide for the social sciences. UK: LongmanWebster, J. and Watson, R.T., 2002. Analyzing the past to prepare for the future: Writing a literature review. MIS quarterly. Available here:https://allaplusessays.com/order, C., 2015. Projects in Computing and Information Systems: A Student’s Guide. 3rd edition. Addison Wesley.Berndtsson, M., Hansson, J., Olsson, B., Lundell, B., 2008. Planning and Implementing your Final Year Project – with Success!: A Guide forStudents in Computer Science and Information Systems. Springer. ISBN 1852333324Cornford, T. & Smithson, S., 2005. Project Research in Information Systems: A Student’s Guide. 2nd edition. Palgrave Macmillan.Fink, A., 2009. Conducting Research Literature Reviews: From the Internet to Paper. 3rd edition. Sage.Weaver, P., 2003. Success in Your Project: A Guide to Student System Development Projects. Springer. ISBN 1848000081

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